Based on the available evidence, it is easy to assume that Earl Weaver perfected managerial sin. After all, the profane potentate of the Orioles has spent the past thirteen seasons kicking dirt on home plate, tearing up rule books under umpires' noses, and generally behaving as if he were renting his soul to the devil with an option to buy. Yet here it is the middle of August and he has only been kicked out of one game. Reputations have been ruined for less.

Understandably, Weaver is not pleased to hear that his dark star appears to be fading. In his corner of Memorial Stadium's third base dugout, he looks up from a pregame meal of a sandwich and a cigarette and searches the horizon for an explanation. "Musta been the foggin' strike," he says at last. "Guys like me, I coulda got tossed five foggin' times in the time we were off. I'm streaky that way."

Satisfied, he resumes dining only to be interrupted moments later by Jim Palmer, the noted pitcher and underwear model. With a mischievous smile, Palmer raises his voice in a song that suggests one more reason why his fearless leader has been wont to raise hell with umpires: "Happy Birthday."

"Oh," Weaver says, "you remembered."

"Of course," Palmer says.

"I know why you remembered, too," Weaver tells his favorite rascal. "You know that at my age, it's gotta hurt."

From John Schulian's 1981 column (which can be found in his fine collection, Sometimes They Even Shook Your Hand: Portraits of Champions Who Walked Among Us).

[Photo Credit: Associated Press]