Last weekend over at the Stacks' Daily Beast home, I reprinted one of my favorite stories. Mark Jacobson's beautiful profile of Harold Conrad. Don't sleep:

The last time I saw Harold Conrad, he was lying in a hospital bed wearing dark sunglasses. Leave it to Harold to stake out a small territory of cool amid the fluorescent lighting, salt-free food, and stolid nurses bearing bedpans. The results were in by then, a tale told in black shadows on X-ray transparencies: one in the lung, the other in the head. But Harold always had an angle, and even now, a step from death, the cancer throughout his 80-year-old body, he sought an edge.

He motioned me closer, rasped into my ear, "Did you bring a joint?"

A few weeks later, after Harold died, I told this story at a memorial service. It got a laugh. Several of Harold's old friends were there, telling Harold Conrad stories. Norman Mailer recalled the evening Harold once saved his life. Mailer was drunk that night, he didn't notice the television set falling off the shelf above him, hardly even saw Harold, stronger than he looked, snatch the machine out of midair.

"Harold Conrad preserved half my head," Mailer said.

Budd Schulberg (author of What Makes Sammy Run?) talked about a wild week in Dublin, where Harold found himself promoting a Muhammad Ali fight and how everyone lost money when the crowd stormed the gates because, people said, "It is an insult to ask an Irishman to pay to see a fight." Bill Murray recollected a particularly gelatinous massage and steam bath procedure Harold once directed him to. "I was trapped. Melting away. Soon I would be a wet spot on the floor. And I said: I used to be somebody before I met this Harold Conrad." These stories got laughs, which was only right. Harold would never tolerate a wake that didn't turn into a celebration; that would go double for his own.

You could say this about Harold Conrad, newspaperman, superflack, friend to bard and bozo, custodian of a bygone age—he went out on his forever-bent shield. It was Harold's life mission: to be in his own particular vision of the right place at the right time.

[Photo Credit: Photo by Underwood Archives/Getty]